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July 13, 2018

Blog Tour: Stricken by C.K. Kelly Martin – Interview and Giveaway

Hello Readers!  Welcome to our Tour Stop for

Stricken by C.K. Kelly Martin!

We have Kelly on the blog today for a quick Q&A.

Follow the rest of the tour by clicking on the banner above,
and be sure to enter the giveaway found at the end of the post!

 

 

Naomi doesn’t expect anything unusual from her annual family trip to visit her grandparents in Ireland. What she expects is to celebrate her thirteenth birthday, hang out with her friends Ciara and Shehan, and deal with her gran’s Alzheimer’s. What she finds is a country hit by an unexpected virus that rapidly infects the majority of the Irish population over the age of twenty-one.

Amnestic-Delirium Syndrome (ADS) starts off with memory loss, but the virus soon turns its victims aggravated, blank, or violent. Naomi and her friends must survive on their own, without lucid adults, cut off from the rest of the world, until a cure is found.

But there are whispers that ADS is not terrestrial, and soon Naomi and her friends learn the frightening truth: we are not alone.

Stricken by C.K. Kelly Martin
Publication Date:  November 4, 2017
Publisher:  Dancing Cat Books

BAM | Chapters | Indies | Amazon | B&N | Kobo | TBD | iBooks

 

Thanks so much for taking the time and spending time with us here at Chapter by Chapter!

Thanks very much for having me here at Chapter by Chapter! I’m really excited to chat about Stricken and other bookish things.

 

 

Describe your book in 140 characters or less (like a Tweet)

When everyone over 21 in Ireland develops a memory disease, a 12 year old girl and her friends must battle unknown forces and survive alone

 

 

What was your inspiration for writing this book?  Was it in a dream? A thought while taking a walk?

I’ve always been into both zombie movies and books and plague outbreak stories so I kind of naturally gravitated towards the material in Stricken. I don’t usually have boom moments where a story explodes from nowhere. They tend to percolate quietly in my subconscious over time until they’re solid enough for me to begin to notice them. I was really keen to write a middle grade book (I’d always written about slightly older characters before) so I knew from the beginning this book would revolve around kids instead.

 

 

Tell us about the main character(s).

In a lot of ways Naomi (who is 12 turning 13) is your average Canadian girl. She’s a goalie on a hockey team and close with her family and her friends. Every year she and her parents spend some time visiting her grandparents in Ireland so she also has two friends there, Ciara and Shehan. They’re the people she turns to when the memory disease spreads across Ireland. Naomi and her friends have to find the strength in themselves and each other to survive without adults in a place ravaged by the effects of the virus.

 

My editor had the terrific idea of adding lists to the book and through them we learn a lot about Naomi. There’s a list of her earliest memories, a list of all the girls on her hockey team and what they’re like, places she’s never been but would like to go when the virus ends, the things that used to scare her and then the things that scare her now. By the end of the book I think (and hope!) people feel they know Naomi quite well.

 

 

Do you have a favorite quote or specific part in the book that you really love?

There’s a scene after Naomi’s Mom is stricken by the disease and has run off leaving Naomi alone. Naomi’s speaking to her dad who is back in Canada. Normally he’d had been in Ireland with she and her mom but he had to stay home for work and was going to join them later but now can’t because of a national quarantine. While Naomi’s on the phone with her father she thinks: “He was somewhere that ADS hadn’t touched — a place where people were still going to the beach, getting streaks in their hair, hitting softballs, and having picnics with tortilla chips and fruit salad.” To me that was such a vivid image, life going on as normal somewhere while in Naomi’s immediate surroundings, society is falling to pieces.

 

 

Was there a specific part in the book that you had an especially difficult time writing?  If so, why?

Finding a good point to end the book while still leaving room for more in the future was tricky. I knew the story in my head in its entirety was too long for one book but I wanted to feel like I was leaving the characters with some kind of resolution—that not everything was up in the air.

 

 

What sort of projects do you have going on right now.  Any new books coming out?

I’m not sure what will actually come out next but the projects I have underway are a middle grade sci-fi involving alien abduction, a YA horror that centres around a kidnapping and a speculative YA that deals with memory and death.

 

 

It was great having you on the blog today!  We hope you’ll decide to stop by again someday, and we wish you much success!!

Thanks for all the terrific questions! I had a lot of fun and would love to stop by again sometime.

 

About C.K. Kelly Martin

Long before I was an author I was a fan of books about Winnie the Pooh, Babar, Madeline, Anne Shirley and anything by Judy Blume. Throughout high school my favourite class was English. No surprise, then, that most of my time spent at York University in Toronto was as an English major—not the traditional way to graduate with a B.A. (Hons) in film studies but a fine way to get a general arts education.

After getting my film studies degree I headed for Dublin, Ireland and spent the majority of the nineties there in forgettable jobs meeting unforgettable people and enjoying the buzz. I always believed I'd get around to writing in earnest eventually, and I began writing my first novel in a flat in Dublin and finished it in a Toronto suburb. By then I'd discovered that fiction about young people felt the freshest and most exciting to me. You have most of your life to be an adult but you only grow up once.

Currently residing near Toronto with my Dub husband, I'm an aunt to twenty-one nieces and nephews, and a great-aunt to two great-nephews. I became an Irish citizen in 2001 and continue to visit Dublin as often as I can while working on novels about young people.

My first young adult book, I Know It's Over, came out with Random House in September 2008, and was followed by One Lonely Degree, The Lighter Side of Life and Death, My Beating Teenage Heart and sci-fi thriller Yesterday. I released Yesterday's sequel, Tomorrow, in 2013 and put out my first adult novel, Come See About Me, as an ebook in June 2012. My most recent contemporary YA books, The Sweetest Thing You Can Sing and Delicate, were published by Cormorant Books' Dancing Cat Books imprint in 2014 and 2015.

 

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